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Thread: Adjust Original # so when a % is taken from it, it = original #

  1. #1

    Adjust Original # so when a % is taken from it, it = original #

    My goodness I feel like this is a silly question...

    I'm fairly sure I'm overthinking this one, but here it goes!

    So my specific situation is this: I tell my boss what I'm owed every 2 weeks and he sends me the money through an app - the app itself takes away 2.5% of the money (i.e. if I get sent $2,000 the app takes $50). I've been doing the following equation (using the same $2,000 example) to try and get it back to the real number I'm owed: (2,000*.025)+2,000. The new total would be $2,050 and would result in $51.25 being deducted due to the 2.5% fee from the app which = $1,998.75 (clearly not the $2,000 I'm after).

    I've been doing it this way for nearly a year and what seems like a tiny bit here and there will add up to a hefty sum over several years.

    What should I do to the original number ($2,000) so that when 2.5% is taken from it, it will equal $2,000.

    Hope this makes sense, I feel it's a super simple answer... Joined this forum just for this!

    Thanks for your time.

  2. #2
    Elite Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmdarvn View Post
    My goodness I feel like this is a silly question...<br><br>I'm fairly sure I'm overthinking this one, but here it goes!<br><br>So my specific situation is this: I tell my boss what I'm owed every 2 weeks and he sends me the money through an app - the app itself takes away 2.5% of the money (i.e. if I get sent $2,000 the app takes $50). I've been doing the following equation (using the same $2,000 example) to try and get it back to the real number I'm owed: (2,000*.025)+2,000. The new total would be $2,050 and would result in $51.25 being deducted due to the 2.5% fee from the app which = $1,998.75 (clearly not the $2,000 I'm after).&nbsp;<br><br>I've been doing it this way for nearly a year and what seems like a tiny bit here and there will add up to a hefty sum over several years.<br><br>What should I do to the original number ($2,000) so that when 2.5% is taken from it, it will equal $2,000.&nbsp;<br><br>Hope this makes sense, I feel it's a super simple answer... Joined this forum just for this!<br><br>Thanks for your time.
    2000/(1-0.025) = 2051.282 ............ corrected

    So you should charge 2051.29 (rounding up)

    2.5% of above is = 51.29 (rounding up) = app. charge

    Leaving you with 2000.

    Similar problem solved in https://www.freemathhelp.com/forum/t...ble-percentage
    Last edited by Subhotosh Khan; 06-29-2017 at 03:11 PM.
    “... mathematics is only the art of saying the same thing in different words” - B. Russell

  3. #3
    Elite Member stapel's Avatar
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    15,435

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by wmdarvn View Post
    So my specific situation is this: I tell my boss what I'm owed every 2 weeks and he sends me the money through an app - the app itself takes away 2.5% of the money (i.e. if I get sent $2,000 the app takes $50). I've been doing the following equation (using the same $2,000 example) to try and get it back to the real number I'm owed: (2,000*.025)+2,000. The new total would be $2,050 and would result in $51.25 being deducted due to the 2.5% fee from the app which = $1,998.75 (clearly not the $2,000 I'm after).

    I've been doing it this way for nearly a year and what seems like a tiny bit here and there will add up to a hefty sum over several years.

    What should I do to the original number ($2,000) so that when 2.5% is taken from it, it will equal $2,000.
    To learn how to work with "percent of" exercises, try here.

    Using the method explained and illustrated there, let "n" stand for "net pay", being the amount you're wanting to actually get paid. You know that, whatever the boss sends through the app, 2.5% is taken off. Let "g" stand for this "gross pay" that the boss is submitting.

    Then you have:

    . . . . .(net pay) is (gross pay) less (2.5%) of (gross pay)

    What is the corresponding equation? Then, when you plug "2000" in for "n", what do you get for "g"? So how much should you be asking the boss to submit to the app? (This equation works for any amount "n", of course.)

    If you get stuck, please reply showing your steps so far. Thank you!

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Dec 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmdarvn View Post
    My goodness I feel like this is a silly question...

    I'm fairly sure I'm overthinking this one, but here it goes!

    So my specific situation is this: I tell my boss what I'm owed every 2 weeks and he sends me the money through an app - the app itself takes away 2.5% of the money (i.e. if I get sent $2,000 the app takes $50). I've been doing the following equation (using the same $2,000 example) to try and get it back to the real number I'm owed: (2,000*.025)+2,000. The new total would be $2,050 and would result in $51.25 being deducted due to the 2.5% fee from the app which = $1,998.75 (clearly not the $2,000 I'm after).

    I've been doing it this way for nearly a year and what seems like a tiny bit here and there will add up to a hefty sum over several years.

    What should I do to the original number ($2,000) so that when 2.5% is taken from it, it will equal $2,000.

    Hope this makes sense, I feel it's a super simple answer... Joined this forum just for this!

    Thanks for your time.
    Whatever you tell your boss you're owed you will only get 97.5% of it. Let M be what you are owed. Letting X be what you tell your boss, you want 97.5% of X to equal M or .975X=M or X =M/.975
    A mathematician is a blind man in a dark room looking for a black cat which isn’t there. - Charles R. Darwin

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