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Thread: Help Trying to find Averages With Percentage Ranges (work experience)

  1. #1

    Help Trying to find Averages With Percentage Ranges (work experience)

    Help! I need the average years of experience for individuals who answered a survey with separate ranges.

    If survey respondents answered that...

    24.7% have 1-5 years experience
    10.9% have 6-8 years experience
    18% have 9-12 years experience
    27.6% have 13-18 years experience
    16.7% have 19-25 years experience
    2.1% have 25 years experience

    How do I calculate the total average experience of the group??

    Any help is greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    Elite Member
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    You must pick a representative age in each classification. The whole range will not do, as you have noticed.

    If you have more data, you can use a Mean, a Median, or a Mode - whatever you think is most representative. Lacking additional information, a midpoint may have to do. The only real problem with this methodology is the last grouping. Are your '25's REALLY all exactly 25? If the group really means "25 or more", then it may be more difficult to find a representative age for that classification.

    Let's see where this leads you.
    "Unique Answers Don't Care How You Find Them." - Many may have said it, but I hear it most from me.

  3. #3
    Elite Member stapel's Avatar
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by ckdowling View Post
    If survey respondents answered that...

    24.7% have 1-5 years experience
    10.9% have 6-8 years experience
    18% have 9-12 years experience
    27.6% have 13-18 years experience
    16.7% have 19-25 years experience
    2.1% have 25 years experience

    How do I calculate the total average experience of the group??
    Assume you have some nice number of people; because of the one decimal place for the percentages, let's go with 1,000 (rather than just 100, which would give us fractional people). Then how many people are in each of the classifications?

    When working with ranges like this, often a midpoint is picked. However, since the last classification isn't a range of values, you may want to specify that you're using the lower endpoint of each classification, unless the directions for this exercise specified something else (and you should have been given specific instructions).

    So the 247 people in the 1-5 classification have a total of 247*1 = 247 years (or, if you use the midpoint, 247*3 = 741 years) of experience. And so forth. How many years do you end up with? Dividing this by the number of people, what then is the average number of years of experience?

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