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Thread: Discussing Third-Party SPAMMER

  1. #1
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    Discussing Third-Party SPAMMER

    Quote Originally Posted by a spammer
    You may always consult your teacher or guys from ▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓ and they will clarify any your doubts.
    Hmmm.....
    ▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓


    Which one are you
    Last edited by mmm4444bot; 12-07-2017 at 06:21 AM. Reason: Spamming URLs redacted
    I'm just an imagination of your figment !

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by a spammer
    I agree that the question sounds ambiguous. That`s why you need to solve not taking into account the answer provided. You may always consult your teacher or guys from ▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓ and they will clarify any your doubts. Precise question is a very important part of the task. The answer depends on it. Always clarify the task if you are not sure how to do it.
    Actually, the only person who can really clarify doubts about the meaning of a question is the author of the question! If you are unsure of the meaning of a question posed by your teacher, ask your teacher. Don't ask some third party.

    On the other hand, when you can't ask the author, you can use cues from the context. In this case, it is not an exercise for you to do, but an example that is meant to illustrate something; so the answer given is not to be ignored -- it is the best source of information about what was intended, and will make sure that you learn the intended lesson. A third party (who knows more about the subject than you do) can help you do this interpretation; your teacher is the best one to ask.

    Now, if there are later exercises with similar wording, you can guess that this is what it is intended to mean (if the example wasn't just a typo). I occasionally have to do this in helping a student with a textbook: "now you know what the book means by this phrase, or what they expect you to do for this kind of problem".
    Last edited by mmm4444bot; 12-07-2017 at 06:21 AM. Reason: Quotation redaction

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Peterson View Post
    Actually, the only person who can really clarify doubts about the meaning of a question is the author of the question! If you are unsure of the meaning of a question posed by your teacher, ask your teacher. Don't ask some third party.

    On the other hand, when you can't ask the author, you can use cues from the context. In this case, it is not an exercise for you to do, but an example that is meant to illustrate something; so the answer given is not to be ignored -- it is the best source of information about what was intended, and will make sure that you learn the intended lesson. A third party (who knows more about the subject than you do) can help you do this interpretation; your teacher is the best one to ask.

    Now, if there are later exercises with similar wording, you can guess that this is what it is intended to mean (if the example wasn't just a typo). I occasionally have to do this in helping a student with a textbook: "now you know what the book means by this phrase, or what they expect you to do for this kind of problem".
    I fully agree that asking some third party what a problem means is not nearly as likely to be effective as asking the creator of the problem. Unfortunately, it is seldom practical to get a timely answer (or indeed any answer) from the author of a textbook.

    In this case, the wording of the problem and the answer given are woefully inconsistent. I worry about assuming that the same author will use the plural while intending the singular in future problems. And I hate to train a student to ignore basic English grammar when analyzing a problem given in English.

    And like mmm, I suspect that we have someone using this site to promote a site for pay.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffM View Post
    I fully agree that asking some third party what a problem means is not nearly as likely to be effective as asking the creator of the problem. Unfortunately, it is seldom practical to get a timely answer (or indeed any answer) from the author of a textbook.

    In this case, the wording of the problem and the answer given are woefully inconsistent. I worry about assuming that the same author will use the plural while intending the singular in future problems. And I hate to train a student to ignore basic English grammar when analyzing a problem given in English.

    And like mmm, I suspect that we have someone using this site to promote a site for pay.
    Actually, my point was that this for-pay third party is guilty of false advertising! They can't really know what the problem is supposed to mean. And what we have been doing -- showing (a) that the problem is just wrong, and (b) how to recognize that fact and move on -- is the best that can be done. The teacher is really the one to discuss it with, since that is how you move on with learning.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Peterson View Post
    Actually, my point was that this for-pay third party is guilty of false advertising!
    I certainly agree with that. But several of us are third parties, and I don't think we gave misleading advice. I may have read your previous post about third parties too literally.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffM View Post
    I certainly agree with that. But several of us are third parties, and I don't think we gave misleading advice. I may have read your previous post about third parties too literally.
    Well, we're all third parties! (That is, neither the author nor the student.) I was referring to us (positively) when I said, "A third party (who knows more about the subject than you do) can help you do this interpretation". The negative comment about third parties was intended only for the one who claimed to "clarify any your doubts", rather than just to "help". I was probably trying to be too subtle.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denis View Post
    Which one are you
    They are the one who is a SPAMMER (posting from Prague, Czechia) and has just been reported and banned.

    As a reminder to everybody, please do not repost spamming URLs. Use the post-reporting tool, instead.

    Thank you.
    "English is the most ambiguous language in the world." ~ Yours Truly, 1969

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