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    How Many Stops (delivering various parts to multiple work stations)

    Am I being short changed? I am required to deliver various parts to multiple work stations. I must stop at each station on my 1st of 3 loops and only at stations that require parts on my 2nd and 3rd loop. At one particular station there are 3 separate parts used there. Part #1 requires .27 containers per day, part #2 requires .12 container per day and part #3 requires .06 containers per day. I am paid for 1.3 stops per day based on the following calculation.

    1+.45-.45/3=1.3

    Where,

    1=mandatory 1stop
    .45=total #of containers required per day
    3=# of trips per day

    Does this calculation accurately represent the number of stops I am likely to make at this station each day?
    As the containers are likely to be delivered on different loops, shouldn't they be considered separately vs the total?

    Tanks,

    Dan

  2. #2
    Elite Member stapel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Wilson View Post
    Am I being short changed? I am required to deliver various parts to multiple work stations. I must stop at each station on my 1st of 3 loops and only at stations that require parts on my 2nd and 3rd loop. At one particular station there are 3 separate parts used there. Part #1 requires .27 containers per day, part #2 requires .12 container per day and part #3 requires .06 containers per day. I am paid for 1.3 stops per day based on the following calculation.

    1+.45-.45/3=1.3

    Where,

    1=mandatory 1stop
    .45=total #of containers required per day
    3=# of trips per day

    Does this calculation accurately represent the number of stops I am likely to make at this station each day?
    As the containers are likely to be delivered on different loops, shouldn't they be considered separately vs the total?
    I don't understand the reasoning for the "1 + 0.45 - (0.45/3)" computation. Also, surely information is needed regarding the probabilities of parts being needed by the various stations...?

    When you reply, please include the full and exact text of the exercise, the complete instructions, recent topics of study (in your statistics class), and a clear listing of your thoughts and efforts so far. Thank you!

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by stapel View Post
    I don't understand the reasoning for the "1 + 0.45 - (0.45/3)" computation. Also, surely information is needed regarding the probabilities of parts being needed by the various stations...?

    When you reply, please include the full and exact text of the exercise, the complete instructions, recent topics of study (in your statistics class), and a clear listing of your thoughts and efforts so far. Thank you!
    This an actual workplace issue Iím facing, not a classroom exercise. The calculation was provided to me by engineering as justification for paying me to stop at this station 1.3 times per day. Thier calculation doesnít seem to reflect my experience and I do not possess the math skills to question their calculation. Iím hoping you can help me.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Wilson View Post
    This an actual workplace issue Iím facing, not a classroom exercise. The calculation was provided to me by engineering as justification for paying me to stop at this station 1.3 times per day. Thier calculation doesnít seem to reflect my experience and I do not possess the math skills to question their calculation. Iím hoping you can help me.
    As stapel said, the formula doesn't seem to make a lot of sense; perhaps if they explained it, we could judge it better, but it seems that more information would be needed. It's also unclear to me what it even means to be paid per stop; how does it relate to an hourly wage, or to anything else that could be compared to others' pay?

    My recommendation would be to show them that their formula is inadequate by presenting actual data. Record how many stops you make each day (along with any other information that might be useful, such as how long a stop takes), and show them that, over some length of time like a month, it does not average out to match their formula.

    I'll make an attempt to create a formula based on the insufficient information it is based on, to see if there is at least some sense in it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Wilson View Post
    I must stop at each station on my 1st of 3 loops and only at stations that require parts on my 2nd and 3rd loop. At one particular station there are 3 separate parts used there. Part #1 requires .27 containers per day, part #2 requires .12 container per day and part #3 requires .06 containers per day. I am paid for 1.3 stops per day based on the following calculation.

    1+.45-.45/3=1.3

    Where,

    1=mandatory 1stop
    .45=total #of containers required per day
    3=# of trips per day
    Presumably you deliver only whole containers, so you stop as many times as there are whole containers needed. In 100 days, you would then stop at the station 27 times for the first part, 12 times for the second, and 6 for the third. If we suppose that you never stop for two reasons at once, this means 45 stops per 100 days; in reality this would be somewhat less. So the total number of stops per day would be 1 (the required stop) + 0.45 (delivering a container) - 0.45/3 (the number of times a container would be needed on the required stop that is already counted).

    So it does make some sense. But it's a rather simplistic calculation, so if I made it, I would welcome actual data that showed it's wrong, and would then try to figure out what it is about the frequency of deliveries that made the calculation wrong, in order to improve it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Peterson View Post
    My recommendation would be to show them that their formula is inadequate by presenting actual data. Record how many stops you make each day (along with any other information that might be useful, such as how long a stop takes), and show them that, over some length of time like a month, it does not average out to match their formula.
    I should have added that you should also record how many containers are used, in order to compare your number of stops to the actual calculation using real numbers.This could also help check the assumptions they seem to be making. If I were to look at your data, I would want to do all of this.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Peterson View Post
    I should have added that you should also record how many containers are used, in order to compare your number of stops to the actual calculation using real numbers.This could also help check the assumptions they seem to be making. If I were to look at your data, I would want to do all of this.
    The significance of the number of stops is that there are a certain number of pre set timed elements associated with each stop such as acceleration/deceleration, walking to the work station etc. The job is timed/paid based on a per day basis, hence the partial container calculation. The constants are that there are three trips per day and it is mandatory to stop at each station on the first trip.

    There are three different parts delivered to a particular station based on the usage of Part #1 at .27 containers per day part #2 at .12 containers per day and Part #3 at .06 containers per day. The parts could be delivered on any of the three trips. One, two, three or none could be delivered on any trip but since the usage is < one container per day, no more than one container of any part # would be delivered on a given day. I believe this would create 61 separate delivery possibilities. i.e. Day one - none on the first trip, part #2 on the second trip, none on the third trip, requiring 2 stops - the first trip mandatory stop and for a delivery on the 2nd trip. Day 2 - Part 3 on 1st trip, none on 2nd and part #3 n 3rd. again 2 stops. etc

    Based on the low frequency of deliveries for these part #'s collection of actual data would be extremely time consuming. Also, frequency changes on a regular basis. Having said that, I hoping for a calculation, based on the above information to determine how many times per day I am likely to stop at this station. Given that I must stop on he 1st trip I believe it is, 1+ the possibility I would deliver parts on the 2nd and/or 3rd trip.

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