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Thread: how to explain why ax = bx will always have at least one solution?

  1. #1

    how to explain why ax = bx will always have at least one solution?

    The question is this:

    Explain why an equation of the form ax = bx will always have at least one solution.


    I know x can be zero. a can be the same as b. but what is the professional explanation?

    Thanks,

  2. #2
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    Mar 2016
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    Truthfully, I'm not really sure what more you want in order to consider it a "professional" solution/explanation. The problem asks you to explain why there's at least one solution, and you've done just that by examining the trivial case when x = 0. Then you even went above and beyond the call of duty to examine the non-trivial case when [tex]x \ne 0[/tex] which results in a "family" of infinitely many solutions such that a = b. What else is there?

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by ksdhart2 View Post
    Truthfully, I'm not really sure what more you want in order to consider it a "professional" solution/explanation. The problem asks you to explain why there's at least one solution, and you've done just that by examining the trivial case when x = 0. Then you even went above and beyond the call of duty to examine the non-trivial case when [tex]x \ne 0[/tex] which results in a "family" of infinitely many solutions such that a = b. What else is there?

    Got it, thank you.

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