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Thread: displacement, velocity, acceleration: y= 2e^(-0.2t+1)sin(2t-1)

  1. #1
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    displacement, velocity, acceleration: y= 2e^(-0.2t+1)sin(2t-1)

    when a mass attached to a spring on flat surface is pulled and extended to a certain distance and released, the horizontal displacement of the mass was modeled by the following function:

    y= 2e^(-0.2t+1)sin(2t-1)

    a) what was the initial distance of the mass from the position of the mass at rest?
    b) what is the velocity of the mass when it came back to resting position for the second time
    c) what would be the acceleration of the mass when it reached the farthest position from the resting position after it was released?

    I would recommend graphing this function using desmos and I was confused on if y is considered as the displacement function.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by peachy View Post
    when a mass attached to a spring on flat surface is pulled and extended to a certain distance and released, the horizontal displacement of the mass was modeled by the following function:

    y= 2e^(-0.2t+1)sin(2t-1)

    a) what was the initial distance of the mass from the position of the mass at rest?
    b) what is the velocity of the mass when it came back to resting position for the second time
    c) what would be the acceleration of the mass when it reached the farthest position from the resting position after it was released?

    I would recommend graphing this function using desmos and I was confused on if y is considered as the displacement function.

    Thanks!
    Yes... as indicated in the first line:

    y is the displacement and is modeled mby the given equation.
    “... mathematics is only the art of saying the same thing in different words” - B. Russell

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Subhotosh Khan View Post
    Yes... as indicated in the first line:

    y is the displacement and is modeled mby the given equation.
    for intital velocity would i set t=0 and then for part b how would I be able to figure out when it came back a second time?

  4. #4
    Elite Member stapel's Avatar
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by peachy View Post
    for intital velocity would i set t=0
    In what? By what reasoning?

    Quote Originally Posted by peachy View Post
    and then for part b how would I be able to figure out when it came back a second time?
    If y gives displacement, then what would a negative value for dy/dt indicate?

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