Best/favorite book for Topology, Analysis?

daon

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2006
Messages
1,284
I was wondering if there was a favorite book for those who wish to learn Topology or Analysis independently? I intend on taking classes in these subjects eventually, but my course-load won't allow it at the moment. I know some here may be teachers and possibly graduate students, so if you've got any suggestions I'd like to hear them.

I've already purchased Walter Rudin's "Mathematical Analysis" from hearing a few praises.

Thanks.
-daon
 

daon

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2006
Messages
1,284
That looks like a fine book, great reviews on Amazon.
I also see they have a used International Edition available for less... I may jump on that.

Thanks pka.
 

galactus

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 28, 2005
Messages
7,216
Try 'Topology Now' by Messer and Starffin. Available at MAA. It is written so it is accessible to undergrads without requiring a lot of prerequisites.
 

daon

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2006
Messages
1,284
I just ordered these books:

Introduction to Topology and Modern Analysis by Simmons, George F.
Elements of Point-Set Topology (Dover Books on Advanced Mathematics)

Totaling a little over $20 shipped. Not too shabby. These with Baby Rudin should occupy those boring summer days nicely.


Topology Now! seems like a good book too. I will shop around to try and find it for a lower price. Thanks galactus.
 

galactus

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 28, 2005
Messages
7,216
It's an MAA book. Only available there. $41.95 for member. $51.95 for non-member. It's hardbound. 254 pages.
 

galactus

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 28, 2005
Messages
7,216
Denis, I think they actually did publish a 'Calculus for Dummies'.
My personal favorite is "Advanced Particle Theory for Dummies".


If you wish to check out the math books at MAA, go to http://www.maa.org
They have nice books on many math topics.

Personally, I do not like Dover books. Though they are inexpensive, they are reprints over old textbooks and can be hard to follow unless you're at graduate level, and then it can be difficult.
 

daon

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2006
Messages
1,284
With my limited experience, I generally agree with your opinion about Dover books. I purchased a few for my undergraduate Analysis class and found them unhelpful for much of the course... Mostly because a lot of the matrial was different or it skipped details my professor spent time on. I'm sure they'll help more with a graduate-level class as you've stated.

But for only four bucks, I see it as a low-risk investment :D. BTW, when I took Calculus for the first time I actually bought "The Idiots Guide to Calculus" and "Calculus for Dummies." THAT was not a smart investment. Totally useless, at least in conjunction my professors.
 
Top