Final step of Integration problem

Green225

New member
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
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1
Hi I have a question about the final step of an indefinite integral,

Integral of [2/{(x-2)^(4/3)}] I have used u substitution and have come up with -3/[(x-2)^(1/3)] + C however I have a solver that tells me that the answer is -6/[(x-2)^(1/3)] + C. I can't seem to find any reason for the change in numerator from 3 to 6. Is there anyone who could help me out? Maybe its something obvious but I just can't see it.

Thanks,
Andre
 

pka

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2005
Messages
7,977
Hi I have a question about the final step of an indefinite integral,

Integral of [2/{(x-2)^(4/3)}] I have used u substitution and have come up with -3/[(x-2)^(1/3)] + C however I have a solver that tells me that the answer is -6/[(x-2)^(1/3)] + C. I can't seem to find any reason for the change in numerator from 3 to 6. Is there anyone who could help me out? Maybe its something obvious but I just can't see it.
You can use this webpage to check your work.

You can also differentiate the found answer to see how it all works.
 
Last edited:

fcabanski

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2013
Messages
77
What became of the 2 in the numerator? When you do that u substitution, you have to do something with the 2 in the numerator. It doesn't disappear.
God once dropped a 2 from the numerator in an integration. The result was the creation of black holes.
 

srmichael

Full Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2011
Messages
848
What became of the 2 in the numerator? When you do that u substitution, you have to do something with the 2 in the numerator. It doesn't disappear.
God once dropped a 2 from the numerator in an integration. The result was the creation of black holes.
The 2 in the numerator is just a constant. It's as if you are taking the integral, finding the result, and then multiplying the answer by 2. So if you take your answer that you dot and not multiply it by 2, you get the correct answer.

Capiche?
 
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