NAMING variables/passion to theoretical manipulation containers

Ryan$

Full Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2019
Messages
292
Hi guys !
I'm so confused about something maybe others think it as simple as it but I find it hard to manipulate and treat with ..along my analysis.

lets assume I want to calculate the sum of integers then, I can define variable like this X is sum of integers, and there's another cosmetics naming which I can define it as sum(integers).
what's confusing me is " sum(integers) " is at the end variable like X but the "()" is annoying me and what's the behind concept of using () in the naming containers?! is using () while naming variables affecting my solution analysis?
 

JeffM

Elite Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2012
Messages
3,560
If I understand your incoherent question, you are asking why we use indices when naming variables.

For example, why use

\(\displaystyle x_1, \ x_2, \text { and } x_3 \text { instead of } x, \ y, \text { and } z.\)

Is that your question?
 

HallsofIvy

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2012
Messages
5,042
Writing a sum as "X" is mathematics. Writing it as "su
Hi guys !
I'm so confused about something maybe others think it as simple as it but I find it hard to manipulate and treat with ..along my analysis.

lets assume I want to calculate the sum of integers then, I can define variable like this X is sum of integers, and there's another cosmetics naming which I can define it as sum(integers).
what's confusing me is " sum(integers) " is at the end variable like X but the "()" is annoying me and what's the behind concept of using () in the naming containers?! is using () while naming variables affecting my solution analysis?
Writing "X" is mathematics. Writing "sum(integers)" appears to be computer code of some kind. One has nothing to do with the other.
 
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