Quadratic equations multiplied to form linear equations...?

Ladybug

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Jul 11, 2007
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Quadratic equations multiplied to form linear equations: How is this done? I have some short points in my math book, but nothing is really explained. I know a quadratic equation is one that has x^2, but I need an explanation of how to get a quadratic to a linear equation.

Also, here's a totally off-topic question: Does y have any higher power than x when put into an equation? I was taught that usually x means 1. Or all they all just "letters"? No value until you know what it is?

Thanks a lot!
 

jonboy

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Jun 8, 2006
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Hello Ladybug!

Does y have any higher power than x when put into an equation?
The value of any exponent depends on the values that it is assigned. If it is just x and its values are all real numbers, then it can't get any "higher" (greater) than that.

Or all they all just "letters"? No value until you know what it is?
Depends. If you are just trying to solve for a certain variable in an equation you might not know what all the "letters" mean. But normally all "letters" whether they are constants, coefficient or variables all have a meaning.

I Hope this help somewhat.
 

stapel

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Re: Quadratic equations multiplied to form linear equations.

Ladybug said:
Quadratic equations multiplied to form linear equations: How is this done? I have some short points in my math book, but nothing is really explained. I know a quadratic equation is one that has x^2, but I need an explanation of how to get a quadratic to a linear equation.
You cannot multiply degree-two expressions (not "equations") and get degree-one results. The product of two degree-two expressions is going to be a degree-four expression. :wink:

At a guess, are you perhaps referring to "factoring"...? :?:

Ladybug said:
Does y have any higher power than x when put into an equation?
I'm not sure what you're getting at here...? The degree on any variable can be anything. There is no limit on the exponents. :!:

Ladybug said:
I was taught that usually x means 1.
Okay; whoever taught you that should be fired, and you should hire a different teacher/tutor, preferrably one with some experience in middle- to high-school mathematics. :shock:

It seems unlikely that you'll be able to make good progress in polynomials when you aren't even familiar with variables, exponents, or evaluation. From what you've posted, it sounds as though you have a month or two of concentrated studies (re-learning) that you need to do before you'll be ready to tackle the quadratic questions. :oops:

But, with diligence and by spending an hour or two a day with a qualified tutor, you should be caught up quickly. Good luck! :D

Eliz.
 

Ladybug

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Joined
Jul 11, 2007
Messages
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Re: Quadratic equations multiplied to form linear equations.

Thanks a lot to both of you for the answers! Yeah...well...I'm learning from a book, not a tutor, so it isn't somebody's fault. Just mine. :oops: And I do need a more thorough book...This fall I'm going to community college, even though I'm homeschooled and in 11th grade, to get some prerequisite courses done...and one of them is math. That should help me a bit. It's an algebra fundamentals math.

Thank you again! I appreciate all your help.
 
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