y intercept -6 parallel to line 2x+3y+4=0

Guitarman

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Aug 22, 2006
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Hello, I am asked to find an equation of the line that satisfies the given conditions.

y-intercept 6; parallel to the line 2x+3y+4=0

I use y=mx+b and get 3y=2x+4
then I believe its y=2/3 + 4/3


but what do i do now with the y intercept, etc.

thanks
 

stapel

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Feb 4, 2004
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Guitarman said:
parallel to the line 2x+3y+4=0

I use y=mx+b and get 3y=2x+4
How did you get "3y = 2x + 4"? Shouldn't there be a "minus" sign (or two) in there somewhere?

Eliz.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi there!!

As Stapel said, don't forget minus signs.

Using y = mx + b you should end up with:

\(\displaystyle \large\\y=-\frac{2}{3}x-\frac{4}{3}\)

Therefore, remember that in form y = mx + b
mx = gradient
b = y-intercept

As long as both equations have the same gradient (value for mx) they will stay parallel!! So all we have to do is change the 'b' value to 6!!

\(\displaystyle y=-\frac{2}{3}x+6\)
 
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