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Thread: How to work out Kg's produced increase over time

  1. #1

    How to work out Kg's produced increase over time

    Hi all,

    I have a problem in a project I am doing and was wondering if anyone has a formula to work out the following problem.

    If I have a starting point of 2600kgs/per hour of product being made and it took 30 minutes to increase the production to 3000kgs, how much extra kgs would i have produced if if it only took me 5 mins to reach 3000kgs.

    is there a calculation i can use to alter the kgs or time and come to a answer in extra kgs produced.


    Thanks to anyone who reply's to this.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bazfalty View Post
    I have a problem in a project I am doing and was wondering if anyone has a formula to work out the following problem.

    If I have a starting point of 2600kgs/per hour of product being made and it took 30 minutes to increase the production to 3000kgs, how much extra kgs would i have produced if if it only took me 5 mins to reach 3000kgs.

    is there a calculation i can use to alter the kgs or time and come to a answer in extra kgs produced.
    The question needs some clarification.

    First, I assume "kgs" is supposed to be the plural of kg; you should never do that, because it's confusing. Also, the second time you seem to have meant kg/h, not kg alone.

    More important: is the question about how many more kg of product would be made in 5 minutes, or in 30 minutes if you continued increasing past the 5 minutes, or in 30 minutes if it reached 3000 kg/h after 5 minutes and then stayed at 3000, or what???

    But once the problem is clear, it appears to be a uniform acceleration problem, which can be solved using simple calculus, or using a simple formula one might learn in physics. It could also be done graphically, by geometrically finding the area under a graph.

    Can you tell us your background in these areas, and if this is a problem for a class, what you have learned that might be relevant? If it is not related to a class, then what is the context?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bazfalty View Post
    If I have a starting point of 2600kgs/per hour of product being made and it took 30 minutes to increase the production to 3000kgs, how much extra kgs would i have produced if if it only took me 5 mins to reach 3000kgs.
    Could be this simple:
    5 min : 3000 - 2600 = 400 kg
    30 min : ?
    I'm just an imagination of your figment !

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Peterson View Post
    The question needs some clarification.

    First, I assume "kgs" is supposed to be the plural of kg; you should never do that, because it's confusing. Also, the second time you seem to have meant kg/h, not kg alone.

    More important: is the question about how many more kg of product would be made in 5 minutes, or in 30 minutes if you continued increasing past the 5 minutes, or in 30 minutes if it reached 3000 kg/h after 5 minutes and then stayed at 3000, or what???

    But once the problem is clear, it appears to be a uniform acceleration problem, which can be solved using simple calculus, or using a simple formula one might learn in physics. It could also be done graphically, by geometrically finding the area under a graph.

    Can you tell us your background in these areas, and if this is a problem for a class, what you have learned that might be relevant? If it is not related to a class, then what is the context?
    Hi Sorry for the confusion. yes kgs was meant to be a plural of kg. sorry.

    yes if after 5 mins it stayed at 3000 for the full 30 mins.

    The background is a project I am working on at work. If my production line starts at 2600 kg produced per hour but within 30 mins on a consistent rise reached 3000kg produced. how many extra kg of product would i achieve if i say produced at 3000kg from the start.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bazfalty View Post
    yes if after 5 mins it stayed at 3000 for the full 30 mins.

    The background is a project I am working on at work. If my production line starts at 2600 kg produced per hour but within 30 mins on a consistent rise reached 3000kg produced. how many extra kg of product would i achieve if i say produced at 3000kg from the start.
    To my mind, the easiest way to think of this is in terms of the area under a graph.

    If you graph the rate, with x = time in hours and y = rate in kg/h, then the total amount of production in a given time is the area under the graph (kg/h * h = kg). The existing rate would be a line from (0, 2600) to (0.5, 3000), and then horizontal after that. The modified rate would be horizontal all the way, starting at (0, 3000). If you got up to 3000 in 5 minutes, you would start with a steeper line.

    The difference in production is just the area between the two. In the scenario you describe here, that will be a triangle with vertices (0, 2600), (0, 3000), and (0.5, 3000). What is the area?

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