calc 3 question: 0=<x<=1 -x^2=<y<=x^2 for the function f(x,y) dydx

BlitzCannon

New member
Joined
Nov 7, 2018
Messages
1
i couldnt get it to let me upload a picture so ill do my best to write it out

I have to rewrite a double integral

original bounds are 0=<x<=1 -x^2=<y<=x^2 for the function f(x,y) dydx



what i got when i rewrote it is -1=<y<=1 sqrt(-y)=<x<=sqrt(y) dxdy

i want to say this is right because i can't think of any other way to do this but i knew that a negative under a square root is an imaginary number so it shouldnt work. Please let me know if im right or wrong!

the follow up question to this ask what the original double integral represents
 

Subhotosh Khan

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 18, 2007
Messages
18,134
i couldnt get it to let me upload a picture so ill do my best to write it out

I have to rewrite a double integral

original bounds are 0=<x<=1 -x^2=<y<=x^2 for the function f(x,y) dydx



what i got when i rewrote it is -1=<y<=1 sqrt(-y)=<x<=sqrt(y) dxdy

i want to say this is right because i can't think of any other way to do this but i knew that a negative under a square root is an imaginary number so it shouldnt work. Please let me know if im right or wrong!

the follow up question to this ask what the original double integral represents
Your response is not quite correct.

Did you draw an approximate sketch of the region over which you are integrating?

If not, do that first.
 
Top