• Welcome! The new FreeMathHelp.com forum is live. We've moved from VB4 to Xenforo 2.1 as our underlying software. Hopefully you find the upgrade to be a positive change. Please feel free to reach out as issues arise -- things will be a little different, and minor issues will no doubt crop up.

division a problem to sub-problems

Ryan$

Member
Hi guys; I'm so confused on how the lecturer said that a problem is like a circle and can dividing it to sub-problems which we can visualize it by dividing a circle to some parts (lets say to three parts which each part generate angle 120) but what's confusing me that between one part of circle and other part there's a line "line which's separate one part from other part" my question is, this line is jointed between one part and other part .. so once we solve a sub problem in one part .. it's still a part from the other part because the line is mutual between two parts, so what's confused me those lines what are they? are they meaning something?! sorry about that but those lines make my all confusion in everyproblem.. how should I consider those lines which dividing a circle to three parts to visualize that we right now need to solve three sub-problem which generate a problem ..


thanks for your help in advance.
 

Dr.Peterson

Active member
Hi guys; I'm so confused on how the lecturer said that a problem is like a circle and can dividing it to sub-problems which we can visualize it by dividing a circle to some parts (lets say to three parts which each part generate angle 120) but what's confusing me that between one part of circle and other part there's a line "line which's separate one part from other part" my question is, this line is jointed between one part and other part .. so once we solve a sub problem in one part .. it's still a part from the other part because the line is mutual between two parts, so what's confused me those lines what are they? are they meaning something?! sorry about that but those lines make my all confusion in every problem.. how should I consider those lines which dividing a circle to three parts to visualize that we right now need to solve three sub-problem which generate a problem ..
I think you're taking an analogy too literally. The intent is clearly to assume that the problem (whatever it might be) can be divided into distinct parts, with no ambiguity.
 

Otis

Member
… I'm so confused on how the lecturer said that a problem is like a circle …

… but what's confusing me that between one part of circle and other part there's a line …

… my question is … once we solve a sub problem in one part .. it's still a part from the other part …

… so what's confused me those lines what are they? are they meaning something?!

… those lines make my all confusion in everyproblem …

… how should I consider those lines … to visualize that we … [have] three sub-problem …
I'll try those parts.

What are the lines? They are markers, to indicate parts of a whole.

Do the lines have meaning? The lines have no special meaning. The diagram could have used dots, instead. Or, the parts could have been shown with spaces. Or, the separate pieces could have been drawn using different colors.

There are many ways to visualize sub-problems comprising a whole project. Can you think of a way that doesn't confuse you? How about a loaf of sliced bread? Maybe different colored Lego pieces stuck together. When I say, "A whole project is broken into parts", what is the first picture that comes to your mind?
 
Last edited:
Top