Help!

Loki123

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2021
Messages
72
This is the problem:
123-jpg.29272

This is how I tried to solve it:
246047914_390618429208044_2810933311381379483_n.jpg
I failed badly. How do I do this?
 

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topsquark

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2012
Messages
1,267
Okay, I don't know about you but the whole ratio symbol thing mixes me up. Anyway, the first thing I'd do would be to change [imath]16 = 2^4 = 2^{8}{2}[/imath]. Leave everything in terms of powers... don't multiply anything out. See if that helps.

-Dan
 

lev888

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2018
Messages
2,551
This is the problem:
123-jpg.29272

This is how I tried to solve it:
View attachment 29273
I failed badly. How do I do this?
How do you know you failed? What's the answer? Maybe your answer can be rewritten to match the correct answer?
If, in fact, your answer is incorrect, try to
1. Use exponents, not radicals.
2. Don't multiply, keep the original bases and only change exponents (see prev. post re 16).
3. Gradually get rid of the parentheses using the rules of exponents.
4. Change division to multiplication by flipping the sign of the denominator's exponent, e.g.: a/(b^(-2)) = ab^2.
 

Loki123

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2021
Messages
72
Okay, I don't know about you but the whole ratio symbol thing mixes me up. Anyway, the first thing I'd do would be to change [imath]16 = 2^4 = 2^{8}{2}[/imath]. Leave everything in terms of powers... don't multiply anything out. See if that helps.

-Dan
What do you mean by this: 282 ?
 

Loki123

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2021
Messages
72
How do you know you failed? What's the answer? Maybe your answer can be rewritten to match the correct answer?
If, in fact, your answer is incorrect, try to
1. Use exponents, not radicals.
2. Don't multiply, keep the original bases and only change exponents (see prev. post re 16).
3. Gradually get rid of the parentheses using the rules of exponents.
4. Change division to multiplication by flipping the sign of the denominator's exponent, e.g.: a/(b^(-2)) = ab^2.
Yay! I solved it. It was surprisingly easy with those rules.
 
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