I need to solve this

oofer

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Nov 19, 2020
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Jim has a total of $103 in $2 and $3 coupons. If he has 40 coupons in all, how many of each kind
does he have? I need an answer to this question, asap. I need to use the substitution method for linear relations.
 

oofer

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Nov 19, 2020
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Jim has a total of $103 in $2 and $3 coupons. If he has 40 coupons in all, how many of each kind
does he have? I need an answer to this question, asap. I need to use the substitution method for linear relations. I was wondering if someone can help walk me through this. I’m having a lot of trouble with it.
 

Subhotosh Khan

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Jim has a total of $103 in $2 and $3 coupons. If he has 40 coupons in all, how many of each kind
does he have? I need an answer to this question, asap. I need to use the substitution method for linear relations.
Name you variables (Find):

# of two dollar coupons = W

# of three dollar coupons = H

First equation: he has 40 coupons in all → W + H = 40

What else?

Please show us what you have tried and exactly where you are stuck.

Please follow the rules of posting in this forum, as enunciated at:


Please share your work/thoughts about this problem.
 

oofer

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I’m stuck with the fact that he has $103 in total. I know that part of the equation but I don’t know where to factor in the 103. It needs to equal 103 and I don’t know how to find that.
 

Jomo

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Jim has a total of $103 in $2 and $3 coupons. If he has 40 coupons in all, how many of each kind
does he have? I need an answer to this question, asap. I need to use the substitution method for linear relations.
If you need an answer asap then you better start right on it. If you need help then you came to the correct place. Can you show us the work you have done so far? That way we know how to help you.
 

Jomo

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Name you variables (Find):

# of two dollar coupons = W

# of three dollar coupons = H

First equation: he has 40 coupons in all → W + H = 40

What else?

Please show us what you have tried and exactly where you are stuck.

Please follow the rules of posting in this forum, as enunciated at:


Please share your work/thoughts about this problem.
Subhotosh, what happened to your u's and v's? Now you use W's and H's??
 

oofer

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Well, I tried x+y=40, but it also has to do x+y=103 as well. I am confused on how I get to 103 using only 40 coupons.
 

Jomo

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You already posted this problem.

You were told to let H = the number of $2 coupons and W = the number of $3 coupons.
You were told that 40 coupons in all becomes H+W=40
If Jim has H $2 coupons then how much are they worth?
If Jim has W $3 coupons then how much are they worth?

What can you say about the total value of the coupons?
 

oofer

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They are both worth $2 and $3 each. Nothing special
 

oofer

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But then it has to equal 103 when you combine 40 of them together
 

Subhotosh Khan

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But then it has to equal 103 when you combine 40 of them together
If Jim has ten $2 coupons then how much are those worth? \(\displaystyle \to \ \ 2 * 10 = $ 20 \)

If Jim has "W" $2 coupons then how much are those worth? \(\displaystyle \to \ \ 2 * W \ \ $ \)

If Jim has "H" $3 coupons then how much are those worth? \(\displaystyle \to \ \ ? \ \ $ \)

If Jim has "W" $2 coupons AND "H" $3 coupons then how much are those worth (in total)? \(\displaystyle \to \ \ ? \ \ $ \)
 

oofer

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Okay, this helped me a bit, Thanks for your help!
 

Otis

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… x+y=40, but it also has to do x+y=103 …
Hi oofer. You ought to define your variables. It helps to understand the meaning of equations.

Let x = the number of $2 tickets
Let y = the number of $3 tickets

The equation x+y=40 means the number of $2 tickets plus the number of $3 tickets adds up to 40 tickets, altogether.

So, we can't say x+y=103 also because 103 is a dollar amount, not a count of tickets.

The correct equation is:

value of $2 tickets + value of $3 tickets = 103

Subhotosh showed you how to express the values on the left-hand side above, using variables.

😎
 

Jomo

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They are both worth $2 and $3 each. Nothing special
No, only 1 $2 coupons is worth $2. H $2 coupons will be worth ...?
 
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