Need help with 2 questions: area of pond, gallons of water; number of truck-loads

SamuelD

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2. You have offered to make a fish pond in the back yard of a senior residence. It needs to be rectangular in shape (2 feet by 3 feet) and 3 feet deep.

(a) How much space (area), in meters squared, will the pond take up?

(b) How many gallons of water will you need to fill the pond? (Remember: One gallon fills 0.1336 cubic feet.)

5. Your next door neighbor is putting in a pool. The pool is 18' by 36', and is filled with water to an average depth of 5.5'. A truck with a cylindrical tank, with a diameter of 9' and a length of 20', will be delivering the water. How many truckloads of water are needed to fill the pool?
 

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Subhotosh Khan

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2. You have offered to make a fish pond in the back yard of a senior residence. It needs to be rectangular in shape (2 feet by 3 feet) and 3 feet deep.

(a) How much space (area), in meters squared, will the pond take up?

(b) How many gallons of water will you need to fill the pond? (Remember: One gallon fills 0.1336 cubic feet.)

5. Your next door neighbor is putting in a pool. The pool is 18' by 36', and is filled with water to an average depth of 5.5'. A truck with a cylindrical tank, with a diameter of 9' and a length of 20', will be delivering the water. How many truckloads of water are needed to fill the pool?
What are your thoughts?

Please share your work with us ...even if you know it is wrong.

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SamuelD

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okay for the first assignment that I sent lesson number

2. what I did for A.

was draw a cube that represents the pond and set the measurements on each sides. Then I I guess calculated the surface area by doing 2 x 3 = 6 ft
after that I converted the 6ft in meters which is 6 x 0.3048 = 1.8288

BLOOP.jpg

For B this is what I did but I am not sure if I did it right.

bloop2.jpg

Now LEsson 5. I didn't understood it at all I don't know what to do.
 

stapel

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2. You have offered to make a fish pond in the back yard of a senior residence. It needs to be rectangular in shape (2 feet by 3 feet) and 3 feet deep.

(a) How much space (area), in meters squared, will the pond take up?

(b) How many gallons of water will you need to fill the pond? (Remember: One gallon fills 0.1336 cubic feet.)

5. Your next door neighbor is putting in a pool. The pool is 18' by 36', and is filled with water to an average depth of 5.5'. A truck with a cylindrical tank, with a diameter of 9' and a length of 20', will be delivering the water. How many truckloads of water are needed to fill the pool?



Question 2. what I did for (a) was draw a cube that represents the pond and set the measurements on each sides. Then I I guess calculated the surface area by doing 2 x 3 = 6 ft
You multiplied (two feet)*(three feet) and ended up with (2*3)(feet*feet) somehow equalling only "feet". Should "area" be in square units? Also, I'm not sure what you mean by "surface area" in this context...? I think they're asking for "the area within the yard"; that is, "how much grass they'll be losing to the pond".

after that I converted the 6ft in meters which is 6 x 0.3048 = 1.8288
Make a correction to the units (see comment above), and then use the appropriate conversion factor.

(Note: You can do a quick check in your head. Six square feet can be rearranged to be six feet long by one foot wide. This is two yards long by one-third yard wide. Using the [very crude] approximation of one yard to one meter, one then has (2 yards)(1/3 yard) = 2/3 square yards, or approximately 2/3 square meters. Getting a value almost three times as high suggests that there is an error somewhere.)

For (b) this is what I did but I am not sure if I did it right.

View attachment 9232
Your image is quite small, but I think you multiplied the three given linear dimensions, and arrived at a volume of 18 cubic feet. This is correct. Now, how many times can 0.1336 cubic feet fit into this value? So how many gallons do you need?

Question 5. I didn't understood it at all I don't know what to do.
They've given you three linear dimensions. They've told you that you need to fill that volume. So a good place to start might be with finding the volume. ;)
 
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