Partial Differentiation

FizzyCrow

New member
Joined
Nov 12, 2004
Messages
5
I do not have a specific problem in mind, i just need to be told, in stupid terms hehehe, how to do a second partial differentiation. I know that there is the partial one with respect to x^2 and y^2, i an having problems understanding how you get the xy, yx one. I also know that they are, in my case, always equal. Any help is appreciated, if you need a problem, i can see if i can pull one from my book.


I also wanted to say thank you to everyone that helped me in my last posts, i've just been so busy, i have not been able to respond, so THANKS :)
 

Unco

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2005
Messages
1,134
\(\displaystyle f(x,y) = x^2 + y^2\)

\(\displaystyle f_x\) means the partial derivative of f(x,y) with respect to x. As you know, we treat y as a constant and differentiate wrt x:

\(\displaystyle f_x = 2x\)
or \(\displaystyle \frac{\partial f}{\partial x} = 2x\)

Likewise,
\(\displaystyle f_y = 2y\) or \(\displaystyle \frac{\partial f}{\partial y} = 2y\)

\(\displaystyle f_{xy}\) reads from left to right in that: "the partial derivative of \(\displaystyle f_x\) wrt y".

But with the chain rule reads:

\(\displaystyle \frac{\partial}{\partial y} \left(\frac{\partial f}{\partial x}\right)\) (which here = 0)
 
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