• Welcome! The new FreeMathHelp.com forum is live. We've moved from VB4 to Xenforo 2.1 as our underlying software. Hopefully you find the upgrade to be a positive change. Please feel free to reach out as issues arise -- things will be a little different, and minor issues will no doubt crop up.

Tax Rate: Express a tax rate of 42 mills on $1.00 as a rate on $1000.00

KWF

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2010
Messages
193
Does "on" as it is used below have the meaning of per?

Express a tax rate of 42 mills on $1.00 as a rate on $1000.00

Would it indicate the following: ...42 mills per $1.00 and ... as a rate per $1000.00?
 

tkhunny

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2005
Messages
9,701
I think you have it. It seems to me that "on" would be used to make it more relatable. We often hear news reports about millage rates changing, but the news agencies think we cannot understand what the rate change means. Thus, they tend to report the additional information, "For a home owner with a house worth $100,000, that's an increase of ..." Just another way to make things more relatable.
 

KWF

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2010
Messages
193
I think you have it. It seems to me that "on" would be used to make it more relatable. We often hear news reports about millage rates changing, but the news agencies think we cannot understand what the rate change means. Thus, they tend to report the additional information, "For a home owner with a house worth $100,000, that's an increase of ..." Just another way to make things more relatable.
I want to thank you for the reply:

The word "per" makes it easier for me to determine the answer. Since the forward slash would indicate "per," I would interpret 42 mills on or per $1.00 as 42 mills/$1.00 and likewise the tax rate on or per $1000 would be 42000 mills/$1000. Mills are usually converted to dollars so if my arithmetic is correct, 42000 mills would equal $42.00 per $1000 or $42.00/$1000.

I hope this explanation is correct.
 
Top